Making Birch Syrup in Alaska

Birch syrup is just one of the many natural renewable resources Alaska has to offer.

We use organic sugar and hand-picked wild berries in our proprietary recipes. We tap the naturally growing Alaskan birch trees for sap. This birch sap is turned into syrup using a traditional method of reduction, including reverse osmosis and evaporators. Alaska Birch syrup is known for its distinctively dark, rich color, and caramel-like flavor.

Birch Vs. Maple

Birch sap has a much shorter tapping season than Maple sap, and is more sensitive to temperature. It takes 40 gallons of maple sap to make 1 gallon of maple syrup. You need over 100 gallons of birch sap to make 1 gallon of birch syrup. In the United States alone, there are over 4 million gallons of maple syrup produced per year. Less than 5000 gallons of birch syrup is produced worldwide every year.

100% Pure Alaska Birch Syrup is a truly unique and delicious treat!

Question:

How long is your season to collect sap?

Answer:

Our seasons vary from 7 days up to our longest season of 18 days. Temperature and snow fall can make huge differences in our sap collection.

Question:

How do you cook the sap down to syrup? 

Answer:

We filter our sap and put the sap through a reverse osmosis. After that process it is slowly simmered in our wood fired 10' long evaporator.

Question:

Does it hurt the tree? 

Answer:

No, We love our trees. We tap according to standard recommendations of 5 consecutive years with a two year rest period.

Question:

What does birch syrup taste like?

Answer:

Our Alaska birch syrup has profiles of dark brown sugar with hints of molasses, sorghum and caramel.

Question:

Is birch syrup good for you?

Answer:

Birch syrup is very low on the glycemic index (50) and is rich in vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, potassium, manganese, thiamine and calcium. Unlike maple syrup, which is composed of sucrose, this syrup is composed of fructose which is a gentler choice. Our trees are in the wild forests of Alaska, they are not farmed. This means the soil is still full of trace minerals and has not been depleted.

Question:

What local berries do you use? 

Answer:

We are very blessed in Alaska to have wild natural products. We use wild blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, strawberries, chokecherries, spruce tips, fireweed and more. Learning about our boreal forests is a lifelong passion that is enjoyed by our whole family. Harvesting and gathering in Alaska is a way of connecting together and with our beautiful surroundings. 

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